No. 74 THE SILENCE OF THE LAMBS (1991)

Well, Clarice – have the lambs stopped screaming?

The Silence of The Lambs opens with a scene in the woods. Mist is gathering. A young woman is jogging alone. The caption says “Near Quantico”. Eerie music is playing. The camera cuts to the woman’s feet pounding the ground faster and faster. Then the focus shifts back to her face and then to the surroundings. And back to the feet again. The music is building up the promise that something horrible will happen at some point. Suddenly somebody is running to her yelling her name. When he turns around, we see FBI on his cap.

What a brilliant opening scene! And to think that the original idea for the first scene was a drug bust. But thankfully Jodie Foster, who plays Clarice Starling, managed to convince the director Jonathan Demme to change that scene.

                                                             Do you spook easily, Starling?

The Silence of The Lambs is one of the best crime dramas to this date. It was the first crime movie to win five Oscars and it has inspired so many movies. Entertainment Weekly voted it as the fourth scariest film of all time. And I wholeheartedly agree. I have chills even thinking about Dr. Lecter and his taste for meat – human meat.

                                                             My precious…

This movie is based on a novel by Thomas Harris. It tells a story about a rookie FBI agent, who is sent by a veteran agent Jack Crawford (Scott Glenn) of the FBI’s Behavioral Science Unit to interview a psychopathic serial killer Dr. Hannibal Lecter (Anthony Hopkins). Dr. Lecter used to be a brilliant psychologist. He also has an uncanny ability to get inside your head. Agent Crawford warns Starling not to share any personal information with Dr. Lecter. She does it anyways. However, doing so she manages to get Dr. Lecter to help the FBI to catch a loose serial killer “Buffalo Bill”, who kidnaps young women and skins them. But she is also letting Dr. Lecter loose inside her head.

I have chills and they are multiplying…

The screenplay is full of suspense and witty lines. The acting is excellent. Jodie Foster is great as the young agent, who has so much to prove in a male world of FBI. Not to mention that this movie created one of the most memorable villains in the movie history – Dr. Hannibal Lecter (Anthony Hopkins). It is so easy to forget that Hopkins only has a little bit more than 16 minutes of screen time, so powerful and memorable is his interpretation of this cannibalistic serial killer. When Hopkins read the script for the first time, he had a hunch that Lecter’s personality would fascinate people. But even he could not imagine the lengths that this fascination would reach. Hopkins read the script 250 times (only his part) to get to know his character. This is something he does with all his roles. He was able to convince Jonathan Demme and the costume designer Colleen Atwood that in the scenes when Lecter is moved from Baltimore, he should be wearing a white jumpsuit instead of the normal yellow or orange to make his character feel more clinical and unsettling. I think that summons up Dr. Lecter quite well. You are scared of him, but at the same time Anthony Hopkins makes you feel sorry for Dr. Lecter’s circumstances. That truly is great acting!

                                                                 I am having an old friend for dinner…

Jonathan Demme uses impressive directorial shots and thus manages to catch the suspense masterfully. One of the best scenes is towards the end of the movie is which Demme uses twin frames of Clarice ringing a doorbell and FBI agents charging into a house. Another reason why this movie is so memorable is the score by Howard Shore. It accentuates the script. Like in all the good movies, all the separate aspects work well together. Even though this movie scares me, I do feel compelled to watch it again from time to time.

Don’t forget your phone call… Is it coming from inside the house???!!!

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